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International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences (IJCMAS)
IJCMAS is now DOI (CrossRef) registered Research Journal. The DOIs are assigned to all published IJCMAS Articles.
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2019 - IJCMAS--ICV 2019: 96.39 For more details click here
National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS) : NAAS Score: *5.38 (2020) [Effective from January 1, 2020]For more details click here

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National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS)
NAAS Score: *5.38 (2020)
[Effective from January 1, 2020]
For more details click here

ICV 2019: 96.39
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2019 - IJCMAS--ICV 2019: 96.39
For more details click here

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Original Research Articles

PRINT ISSN : 2319-7692
Online ISSN : 2319-7706
Issues : 12 per year
Publisher : Excellent Publishers
Email : editorijcmas@gmail.com / submit@ijcmas.com
Editor-in-chief: Dr.M.Prakash
Index Copernicus ICV 2018: 95.39
NAAS RATING 2020: 5.38

Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci.2016.5(9): 508-513
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2016.509.056


Microbial Contamination of Mobile Phones in a Tertiary Health Care Setting
J.Lavanya1*, N.B. Swaroop Rani1, Manoj Jais2 and Amruth Kishan Upadhya1
1Subbaiah Institute of Medical Sciences, Shimoga, Karnataka State, India
2Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India
*Corresponding author
Abstract:

Mobile phones are widely used as nonmedical portable electronic devices and it is in close contact with the body. This study shows how mobile phones can pose serious threats to patients in Paediatric ICU and nursery. 100 samples from keypads of mobile phones were taken using moistened sterile swab from doctors and nurses working in pediatric intensive care unit and nursery of lady hardinge medical college and associated hospitals, New delhi. Bacteria were identified and antibiotic sensitivity determined using standard procedures. 56% of mobile phones showed growth.  Majority of isolates were CoNS (Coagulase negative Staphylococci) (71.4%), followed by S.aureus (10.7%), Acinetobacter (10.7%) and E.coli (7.1%). 45% CoNS and 33.3% S.aureus were resistant to penicillin, oxacillin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, Cotrimoxazole and clindamycin. 7.5% CoNS and 16.6% S. aureus were resistant to levofloxacin and tetracycline. 33.3% Acinetobacter and 25% E. coli were resistant to gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin cotrimoxazole and ceftazidime, whereas only 16.6% Acinetobacter were resistant to levofloxacin. This study provides the baseline data for formulating strict guidelines to minimize cross-infection by means of mobile phones in pediatric ICU and nursery.


Keywords: Mobile phones, contamination, pediatric ICU, CoNS,health care workers.
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How to cite this article:

Lavanya, J., N.B. Swaroop Rani, Manoj Jais and Amruth Kishan Upadhya. 2016. Microbial Contamination of Mobile Phones in a Tertiary Health Care SettingInt.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci. 5(9): 508-513. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2016.509.056