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International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences (IJCMAS)
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National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS)
NAAS Score: *5.38 (2019)
[Effective from January 1, 2019]
For more details click here

ICV 2017: 100.00
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2017 - IJCMAS--ICV 2017: 100.00
For more details click here

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PRINT ISSN : 2319-7692
Online ISSN : 2319-7706
Issues : 12 per year
Publisher : Excellent Publishers
Email : editorijcmas@gmail.com / submit@ijcmas.com
Editor-in-chief: Dr.M.Prakash
Index Copernicus ICV 2017: 100.00
NAAS RATING 2018: 5.38

Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci.2018.7(4): 3841-3845
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2018.704.432


Climate Change and Mixed Crop Livestock Farming Systems in Developing Countries: Importance and Impacts
G.N. Gurjar1*, Sanjay Swami1, E.A.S. Lyngdoh1, N. Laitonjam2, Kamal Kant1, Shubham Singh1 and Manish Olaniya1
1School of Natural Resource Management, 2School of Social Science, Central Agricultural University, CPGS, Umiam, Meghalaya-793103, India
*Corresponding author
Abstract:

Crop production and livestock both are most important aspects of agriculture. Because in farming systems based on mixed crop livestock the waste or by product of one system is used as input to second system. Soil-fertility depletion in smallholder farms is the main biophysical process explaining the impact of climate change on decline in per capita food production. At farm scale, however, it becomes evident that the set of processes leading to soil- fertility depletion is not homogeneously distributed in space. Variability in soil fertility arises from differences in underlying geology and geo-morphology, and due to a number of mechanisms within the farming systems (i.e. farm management practices). Farmers manage several organic and mineral resources in order to attain their production goals. The net flow of resources is not equal for the various fields belonging to a single farm household but varies substantially, creating areas with carbon and nutrient accumulation and depletion. Some of the nutrient flows and transfers involved vary strongly between farmers of differing social status, notably between cattle owners and non-cattle owners. A differential long-term management of the different fields of a farm adds an important source of variability, creating zones of soil fertility due to concentration of agricultural produce and organic wastes around the homesteads under changing climate.


Keywords: Mixed crop, Livestock, Climate change, Soil fertility, Food production
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How to cite this article:

Gurjar, G.N., Sanjay Swami, E.A.S. Lyngdoh, N. Laitonjam, Kamal Kant, Shubham Singh and Manish Olaniya. 2018. Climate Change and Mixed Crop Livestock Farming Systems in Developing Countries: Importance and Impacts.Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci. 7(4): 3841-3845. doi: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2018.704.432