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International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences (IJCMAS)
IJCMAS is now DOI (CrossRef) registered Research Journal. The DOIs are assigned to all published IJCMAS Articles.
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2018 - IJCMAS--ICV 2018: 95.39 For more details click here
National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS) : NAAS Score: *5.38 (2020) [Effective from January 1, 2020]For more details click here

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National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS)
NAAS Score: *5.38 (2019)
[Effective from January 1, 2019]
For more details click here

ICV 2018: 95.39
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2017 - IJCMAS--ICV 2018: 95.39
For more details click here

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Original Research Articles

PRINT ISSN : 2319-7692
Online ISSN : 2319-7706
Issues : 12 per year
Publisher : Excellent Publishers
Email : editorijcmas@gmail.com / submit@ijcmas.com
Editor-in-chief: Dr.M.Prakash
Index Copernicus ICV 2018: 95.39
NAAS RATING 2020: 5.38

Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci.2020.9(3): 2185-2199
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2020.903.251


Implications of Climate Change on Vector and Vector-Borne Parasitic Diseases: A Bird’s Eye View
Savita Bisen1*, Nidhi Rawat2, Namrata Wahane1 and Pradeep Dubey3
1Department of Veterinary Parasitology, College of Veterinary Science and A.H., Anjora, Durg, Chhattisgarh, India
 2Department of Veterinary Microbiology, College of Veterinary Science and A.H., Anjora, Durg, Chhattisgarh, India
3Department of Veterinary Pathology,College of Veterinary Science and A.H., Anjora, Durg, Chhattisgarh, India
*Corresponding author
Abstract:

Global climate change and increased climate variability are particularly likely to affect vector and vector-borne parasitic diseases. Climate change will affect the distribution and incidence of vector-borne parasitic diseases globally. Climate change, particularly global warming, is already altering habitat quality, species distributions, biodiversity and many essential ecosystem services. Arthropods are highly sensitive to changes in temperature and precipitation as they cannot regulate their own internal temperatures and are therefore critically dependent on climate for survival and development. Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) are among the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world today affecting nearly half of the world’s population, the majority of who reside in developing countries located in the tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Improved surveillance and monitoring is needed so as to detect changes resulting from global climate and ecological change, both for the identification of immediately required action and to serve as the basis for developing predictive models. Predicting how the long-term distribution and prevalence of such important human and animal diseases will change in the face of global warming is a key challenge facing humans in the near future.


Keywords: Climate change, Vector, Vector-borne parasitic diseases, Global warming, Remote-sensing, Geographic information system (GIS)
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How to cite this article:

Savita Bisen, Nidhi Rawat, Namrata Wahane and Pradeep Dubey. 2020. Implications of Climate Change on Vector and Vector-Borne Parasitic Diseases: A Bird’s Eye View.Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci. 9(3): 2185-2199. doi: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2020.903.251