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International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences (IJCMAS)
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National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS)
NAAS Score: *5.38 (2020)
[Effective from January 1, 2020]
For more details click here

ICV 2018: 95.39
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2018 - IJCMAS--ICV 2018: 95.39
For more details click here

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PRINT ISSN : 2319-7692
Online ISSN : 2319-7706
Issues : 12 per year
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Editor-in-chief: Dr.M.Prakash
Index Copernicus ICV 2018: 95.39
NAAS RATING 2020: 5.38

Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci.2020.9(2): 939-959
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2020.902.111


Effect of Tillage with Organic and Inorganic Fertilizer Management Practices on Soil Aggregation and Aggregate Associated Carbon Fractions to a Sub-tropical Soil under Rice-Wheat Rotation: A Review
R.K. Naresh1, N.C. Mahajan2, R.S. Rathore3 and M. Sharath Chandra1*
1Department of Agronomy, Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture & Technology, Meerut, (UP), India
2Department of Agronomy, Institute of Agricultural Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi,(U.P.), India
3Uttar Pradesh Council of Agricultural Research (UPCAR), Lucknow, (U.P.), India
*Corresponding author
Abstract:

Soil tillage can affect the stability and formation of soil aggregates by disrupting soil structure. Frequent tillage deteriorates soil structure and weakens soil aggregates, causing them to be susceptible to decay. Different types of tillage systems affect soil physical properties and organic matter content, in turn influencing the formation of aggregates. The objective of this review study was to evaluate the effect of tillage and fertilization on soil aggregates and associated organic carbon fractions to a subtropical soil and to identify the optimal conservation tillage in this system. The average concentration of particulate organic carbon (POC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in organic manure plus inorganic fertilizer treatments (NP+S and NP+FYM) in 0–60 cm depth were increased by 64.9–91.9%, 42.5–56.9%, and 74.7–99.4%, respectively, over the CK treatment. Average SOC concentration of the control treatment was 0.54%, which increased to 0.65% in the RDF treatment and 0.82% in the RDF+FYM treatment. Compared to F1 control treatment the RDF+FYM treatment sequestered 0.28 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 whereas the NPK treatment sequestered 0.13 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. As tillage intensity increased there was a redistribution of SOC in the profile, but it occurred only between ZT and PRB since under CT, SOC stock decreased even below the plow layer. Increased SOC stock in the surface 50 kg m-2 under ZT and PRB was compensated by greater SOC stocks in the 50-200 and 200-400 kg m-2 interval under residue retained, but SOC stocks under CT were consistently lower in the surface 400 kg m-2. Over the last 16 years, CT lost 0.83 ±0.2 kg of C m-2 while ZT gain 1.98 ±0.3 and PRB gain 0.97±0.2 kg of C m-2 in the 1200 kg of soil m-2 profile. However increasing the quantity of C input could enhance soil C sequestration or reduce the rate of soil C loss, depending largely on the local soil and climate conditions. SOC can be best preserved by crop rotations with conservation tillage practices such as no or reduced tillage, and with additions of residues, chemical fertilizers and manure SOC change was significantly influenced by the crop residue retention rate and the edaphic variable of initial SOC content. Soil disturbance by tillage leads to destruction of the protective soil aggregate. This in turn exposes the labile C occluded in these aggregates to microbial breakdown. A higher amount of macro-aggregates along with greater accumulation of particulate organic C indicates the potential of conservation tillage for improving soil carbon over the long-term in rice-wheat rotation in North India.


Keywords: Tillage management, aggregates, aggregate associated Carbon, soil organic carbon
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How to cite this article:

Naresh, R.K., N.C. Mahajan, R.S. Rathore and Sharath Chandra. M. 2020. Effect of Tillage with Organic and Inorganic Fertilizer Management Practices on Soil Aggregation and Aggregate Associated Carbon Fractions to a Sub-tropical Soil under Rice-Wheat Rotation: A Review.Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci. 9(2): 939-959. doi: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2020.902.111