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International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences (IJCMAS)
IJCMAS is now DOI (CrossRef) registered Research Journal. The DOIs are assigned to all published IJCMAS Articles.
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National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS)
NAAS Score: *5.38 (2017)
[Effective from January 1, 2017]
For more details click here

ICV 2017: 100.00
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2017 - IJCMAS--ICV 2017: 100.00
For more details click here
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PRINT ISSN : 2319-7692
Online ISSN : 2319-7706
Issues : 12 per year
Publisher : Excellent Publishers
Email : editorijcmas@gmail.com / submit@ijcmas.com
Editor-in-chief: Dr.M.Prakash
Index Copernicus ICV 2017: 100.00
NAAS RATING 2018: 5.38

Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci.2018.7(11): 1485-1495
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2018.711.171


Electronic Devices - A Potential Threat to Hospital Infection Control
Sowmya Kanthimathinathan* and Manisha S. Mane
Department of Microbiology, ESIC Medical College and Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, K.K. Nagar, Chennai 600078, Tamil Nadu, India
*Corresponding author
Abstract:

Electronic devices are increasingly used by the healthcare workers. They can get contaminated with pathogenic organisms and can act as a source of healthcare associated infections. In this study we aimed to determine the bacterial contamination rates of the electronic devices handled by the healthcare workers posted in high risk areas like ICU’s, NICU’s and operation theatres. Swabs were collected from personal electronic devices of 40 healthcare workers and from 33 common devices used in high risk areas. The participants were divided into 4 groups: doctors, residents, nurses and theatre technicians. The swabs were streaked onto blood agar and MacConkey agar and incubated at 37degree Celsius. The isolates were identified and were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility tests by standard procedures. Of the 45 personal devices including mobile phones and laptops swabbed, 86.7% showed growth of organisms. Coagulase negative staphylococcus species was the most common organism, isolated at the rate of 50.9%. Of the gram- negative bacilli isolated, 16.6% showed ESBL production. The rate of MRSA isolation was 3%. It was found that among the participants 63% and 62.5% were found to be not disinfecting their devices and hands respectively. Electronic devices were found to be carriers of infectious pathogens. Strict guidelines have to be introduced for proper usage and disinfection of the devices and hands.


Keywords: Disinfection, Electronic devices, Healthcare associated infections, Institutional devices, Source
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How to cite this article:

Sowmya Kanthimathinathan and Manisha S. Mane. 2018. Electronic Devices - A Potential Threat to Hospital Infection Control.Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci. 7(11): 1485-1495. doi: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2018.711.171