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International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences (IJCMAS)
IJCMAS is now DOI (CrossRef) registered Research Journal. The DOIs are assigned to all published IJCMAS Articles.
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2016 - IJCMAS--ICV 2016: 92.3 For more details click here
National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS) : NAAS Score: *5.38 (2017) [Effective from January 1, 2017]For more details click here
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National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS)
NAAS Score: *5.38 (2017)
[Effective from January 1, 2017]
For more details click here

ICV 2016: 92.3
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2016 - IJCMAS--ICV 2016: 92.3
For more details click here
journals IJCMAS
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Original Research Articles

PRINT ISSN : 2319-7692
Online ISSN : 2319-7706
Issues : 12 per year
Publisher : Excellent Publishers
Email : editorijcmas@gmail.com / submit@ijcmas.com
Editor-in-chief: Dr.M.Prakash
Index Copernicus ICV 2015: 85.95
NAAS RATING 2017: 5.38

Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci.2016.5(11): 121-125
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2016.511.013


Pranaba Nanda Bhattacharyya, Prasanta Dutta, Satya Ranjan Sarmah, Amarjyoti Tanti, Mausomi Madhab and Rofika Begum
Pranaba Nanda Bhattacharyya, Prasanta Dutta, Satya Ranjan Sarmah, Amarjyoti Tanti, Mausomi Madhab and Rofika Begum
Mycology and Microbiology Department, Tocklai Tea Research Institute (TTRI),Tea Research Association (TRA), Jorhat 785008, Assam, India
*Corresponding author
Abstract:

Tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kunze] is an aromatic beverage yielding perennial plant. The manufactured tea is commonly prepared by pouring hot or boiling water over cured leaves of the Camellia sinensis, an evergreen shrub native to Asia. After water, it records the most widely consumed drink all over the world. India is the second largest producer of tea in the world after China, including the famous Assam tea and Darjeeling tea. However, as the Indian subcontinent is mostly rain fed and the cropping season also needs a moist climate with alternating wet and dry periods, the micro-climate prevailing the region is, thus, prune for the establishment of major tea pathogens like Fusarium solani, responsible for Fusarium die-back disease. Present findings illustrated the impact of an incubation period of 60 days for maximum decomposition (up to 17.4% over untreated control) of the Fusarium treated tea twigs. Nectria formation after 60 days of incubation and softening of stem tissue indicated the decomposition of the fungus treated twigs due to the prominent growth of F. solani. Three replicates were maintained at each case and all the data were statistically designed.


Keywords: Fusarium die-back, micro-climate, Nectria,tea,tea pathogens.
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How to cite this article:

Pranaba Nanda Bhattacharyya, Prasanta Dutta, Satya Ranjan Sarmah, Amarjyoti Tanti, Mausomi Madhab and Rofika Begum. 2016. An in vitro Assessment on Fusarium Decomposition in Tea.Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci. 5(11): 121-125. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2016.511.013