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International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences (IJCMAS)
IJCMAS is now DOI (CrossRef) registered Research Journal. The DOIs are assigned to all published IJCMAS Articles.
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National Academy of Agricultural Sciences (NAAS)
NAAS Score: *5.38 (2019)
[Effective from January 1, 2019]
For more details click here

ICV 2017: 100.00
Index Copernicus ICI Journals Master List 2017 - IJCMAS--ICV 2017: 100.00
For more details click here

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PRINT ISSN : 2319-7692
Online ISSN : 2319-7706
Issues : 12 per year
Publisher : Excellent Publishers
Email : editorijcmas@gmail.com / submit@ijcmas.com
Editor-in-chief: Dr.M.Prakash
Index Copernicus ICV 2017: 100.00
NAAS RATING 2018: 5.38

Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci.2018.7(10): 2735-2742
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2018.710.318


An Update on Milk Fever and Its Economic Consequences
Shahla Perween*, Asmita Singh, Mokshata Gupta and Jatin Kumar Sahoo
Animal Nutrition Division, ICAR- Indian Veterinary, Research Institute, Bareilly, UP, India
*Corresponding author
Abstract:

Nutritional deficiencies, imbalances or erratic management of feeding programs for dairy cows can create various types of health problems generally referred as metabolic diseases. High producing lactating cows are the most susceptible to metabolic diseases during the periparturient period. During this period the animal is tremendously challenged to maintain calcium homeostasis because of physiological and pathological factors. Milk fever is an important metabolic disorder of dairy cattle around the time of calving. Several factors have been consistently associated with increased incidence of milk fever, including parturition and initiation of lactation, advancing age, breed, and diet. Clinical symptoms of this disease include in appetence, tetany, inhibition of urination and defecation, lateral recumbency, and eventual coma and death if left untreated. Parturient paresis is treated intravenously with calcium borogluconate. Of the various methods used in attempts to control the disease, the most progress has been made in dietary management. Until recently, most attention has focused on manipulating the levels of dietary calcium to control milk fever. Furthermore, as the dairy profitability is determined by the biological cycles of milk production and reproduction emphasis should be given on the nutritional management of dairy cows in the dry period as well as at parturition.


Keywords: Milk Fever, Dairy Cows, Calcium Borogluconate and Parturient paresis
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How to cite this article:

Shahla Perween, Asmita Singh, Mokshata Gupta and Jatin Kumar Sahoo. 2018. An Update on Milk Fever and Its Economic Consequences.Int.J.Curr.Microbiol.App.Sci. 7(10): 2735-2742. doi: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2018.710.318